Sunday, October 26, 2014

SALON's Michael Berry on the 'cli fi' genre and Paolo Bacigalupi's telling quote on how he has now embraced it, too!

http://www.salon.com/2014/10/26/the_rise_of_climate_fiction_when_literature_takes_on_global_warming_and_devastating_droughts/


The rise of 'cli fi': When literature takes on global warming and devastating droughts

"The more you pay attention, the more horrifying the world is," says writer Paolo Bacigalupi


Climate fiction is hot right now. Just ask Paolo Bacigalupi, author of  the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning”The Windup Girl” and the young-adult novels “Ship Breaker” and “The Drowning Cities”; there is plenty of narrative potential in depicting global warming, rising seas, peak oil, extreme weather and other aspects of a changing climate. MORE AT LINK

Friday, September 26, 2014

Susan Anderson in Boston on Gail Collins NYT humorous yet hard-hitting oped on climate change

Susan Anderson
writes as a comment in the NYT and her comment was listed as an editor's pick:

re
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/25/opinion/gail-collins-the-politics-of-climate-change.html?_r=0


SUSAN ANDERSON WRITES FROM BOSTON: 
Gail Collins brings her unique light sense of humor to this as usual,
but unusually fails to lighten this dangerously dark and evil tendency
to ignore reality as we all go down the drain.

Just for the record, we are accumulating heat-trapping greenhouse
gases (global warming) at an unprecedented rate. This is increasing
the amount of energy in the system, and operating like a blanket in
warming the overall temperature of the planet. Unfortunately, among
other things this is warming the Arctic at a rapid rate (on average,
the "recovery" in 2013-14 following the shocking melt of 2012 matches
the two years after the shock of 2007 (exceeded by 2012)). This is
likely breaking up the Arctic circulation and causing these polar
incursions that make people think it's not warming.

Unfortunately the endgame on this is the opposite of simple-minded
reaction to short-term appearances, as heat goes north. But our
inability to grasp the concept of long-term change when faced with the
temperature in our backyard is dangerously ignorant, and will have
consequences.

Actions do have consequences, and this is a corker. The sixth
extinction is well under way, and we would do well to take action
instead of prevaricating and procrastinating.

Annual CLIFFIES Cli Fi Movie Awards Gets Underway With Gala Opening



Cli-Fi Movie Awards Honor 'Snowpiercer', 'Intersteller' at 'Cliffies' awards show in Los Angeles


February 15, 2015

The first annual CLI FI MOVIE AWARDS event got underway yesterday with a gala event honoring and recognizing the best cli fi movies fo the year for 2014. The annual awards event, dubbed The Cliffies, is funded independently and has no connection to Hollywood studios or PR deparments, according to organizer Danny Bloom, a climate activist who coined and created the cli fi genre for a purpose: to use the PR term as a wake up tool for humankind.

The first awards program, see photo above for what it might have looked like had you been there, honored the following films for best cli fi movies of the year, with the winners to be announced shortly before the Oscars on February 15, 2015: Best movies nominated were Snowpiercer, Noah, Godzilla, Into the Storm, The Rover and Interstellar.

The stars and directors of the films were honored to with a miniature CLIFFIE statuette, which comes in the shape of an EARTH GLOBE, our planet Earth. Awards were also handed out for best PR campaign for a cli fi movie (INTO THE STORM), best title for a cli fi movie (SNOWPIERCER), the film which most mirrored current climate science issues (TBA), the film which most reflected current social and political events in relationship to climate change issues (TBA) and best novel of 2014 likely to be made into a future CLI FI MOVIE (Margaret Atwood's MADDADDAM TRILOGY).

For more information on the CLIFFIES, contact our PR department at danbloom@gmail.com

ENJOY THE SHOW





ARE WE DOOMED?
YOU DECIDE!

Gail Collins oped in the NYTimes on ''Florida -- That sinking feeling!'' - see key words humor, politics, climate change


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/25/opinion/gail-collins-the-politics-of-climate-change.html

And Boston's Susan Anderson comments at NYT after the article and her comment was listed as an editor's pick. BRAVO, SUSAN!:


SUSAN COMMENTED:

Gail Collins brings her unique light sense of humor to this as usual,but unusually fails to lighten this dangerously dark and evil tendencyto ignore reality as we all go down the drain.
Just for the record, we are accumulating heat-trapping greenhousegases (global warming) at an unprecedented rate. This is increasingthe amount of energy in the system, and operating like a blanket inwarming the overall temperature of the planet. Unfortunately, amongother things this is warming the Arctic at a rapid rate (on average,the "recovery" in 2013-14 following the shocking melt of 2012 matchesthe two years after the shock of 2007 (exceeded by 2012)). This islikely breaking up the Arctic circulation and causing these polarincursions that make people think it's not warming.
Unfortunately the endgame on this is the opposite of simple-mindedreaction to short-term appearances, as heat goes north. But ourinability to grasp the concept of long-term change when faced with thetemperature in our backyard is dangerously ignorant, and will haveconsequences.
Actions do have consequences, and this is a corker. The sixthextinction is well under way, and we would do well to take actioninstead of prevaricating and procrastinating.

Florida Goes Down the Drain

The Politics of Climate Change



by Gail Collins, HUMOROUS YET HARD HITTING oped - NYTimes

September 24, 2044


[HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR:] On Miami Beach, rising sea levels have interesting consequences. The ocean periodically starts bubbling up through local drainpipes. By the time it’s over, the concept of “going down to the water” has extended to stepping off the front porch.
It’s becoming a seasonal event, like swallows at Capistrano or the return of the buzzards to Hinckley, Ohio.
“At the spring and fall high tides, we get flooding of coastal areas,” said Leonard Berry, the director of the Florida Center for Environmental Studies. “You’ve got saltwater coming up through the drains, into the garages and sidewalks and so on, damaging the Ferraris and the Lexuses.”
Ah, climate change. A vast majority of scientific studies that take a stand on global warming have concluded that it’s caused by human behavior. The results are awful. The penguins are dwindling. The polar bears are running out of ice floes. The cornfields are drying. The southwest is frying. HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR
There is very little on the plus side. Except maybe for Detroit. As Jennifer Kingson HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR reported in The Times this week, one scientific school of thought holds that while temperatures rise and weather becomes extreme in other parts of the country, Detroit’s location will turn it into a veritable garden spot. HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR
Miami is probably not used to being compared unfavorably to Detroit. But there you are. HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR

“We’re going to wander around shin-deep in the ocean — on the streets of Miami,” said Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island, who is planning to go on a climate-change tour this month with Florida’s senior senator, Bill Nelson. (The junior senator, Marco Rubio, who’s no fan of “these scientists,” will presumably not be joining the party.)
Once a week, when the Senate is in session, Whitehouse gets up and makes a speech about rising sea levels or disappearing lakes or dwindling glaciers. He’s kind of the congressional climate-change guy. He’s also looking for bipartisan love and feeling lonely. “I’ve got exactly no Republican colleagues helping me out with this,” he said.
There was a time, children, HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR, when the parties worked together on climate-change issues. No more. Only 3 percent of current Republican members of Congress have been willing to go on record as accepting the fact that people are causing global warming. That, at least, was the calculation by PolitiFact, which found a grand total of eight Republican nondeniers in the House and Senate. That includes Representative Michael Grimm of New York, who while laudably open-minded on this subject, is also under indictment for perjury and tax fraud. So we may be pushing 2 percent in January.
This is sort of stunning. We’re only looking for a simple acknowledgment of basic facts. We’ll give a pass to folks who accept the connection between human behavior and climate change, but say they don’t want to do anything about it. HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR
Or that Red China should do something first. HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR
Or: “Who cares? I’m from Detroit!” HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR

RECENT COMMENTS

David

CH

Hammer

In Congress, Republican environmentalists appear to be terrified of what should be the most basic environmental issue possible. Whitehouse blames the Supreme Court’s decisions on campaign finance, which gave the energy barons carte blanche when it comes to spending on election campaigns. It’s certainly true that there’s no way to tick off megadonors like the fabled Koch brothers faster than to suggest the globe is warming. HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR
“At the moment, there’s a dogma in the Republican Party about what you can say,” Tom Steyer told me. He’s the billionaire who formed a “super PAC” to support candidates who acknowledge that climate change exists, that it’s caused by human behavior, and that we need to do something major about it.
Steyer has committed to spending about $100 million this year on ads and organizing in seven states. Many in the campaign-finance-reform community think this is a terrible idea, and that you do not combat the power of right-wing oligarchs to influence American elections by doing the same thing on the left. They have a point. But think of the penguins. HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR
Florida’s Republican governor, Rick Scott, who’s running for re-election, has been asked many times whether he believes in man-made climate change. Lately, he responds: “I’m not a scientist.” Scott is also not a doctor, engineer, computer programmer, personal trainer or a bus driver. Really, it’s amazing he even has the confidence to walk into the office in the morning. HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR
The governor did visit last month with some climate scientists. He began the meeting by making it clear that he did not intend to go anywhere near the word causes. After the group had pulled out their maps and projections — including the one that shows much of Miami-Dade County underwater by 2048 — Scott asked them questions. Which were, according to The Miami Herald, “to explain their backgrounds, describe the courses they taught, and where students in their academic fields get jobs.” HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR
If they’re lucky, the students will wind up someplace where there’s no seawater in the garage. HUMOR REPEAT HUMOR




Disney sued for US$250 million by woman claiming ''Frozen'' is stolen from her life story. Sure.

http://images.eonline.com/static/news/pdf/frozenlawsuit.pdf

LEGAL FILING HERE

Meet John Michael Greer, author of the cli fi novel STAR'S REACH, which is the most important cli fi novel of the 21st century! Read it and weep for the future. Published now!

John Michael Greer is the author of more than thirty books, including
four books on peak oil and one science fiction novel, The Fires of Shalsha,
as well as the weekly peak oil blog The Archdruid Report. A native of the
Pacific Northwest, he now lives in an old red brick mill town in the north
central Appalachians with his wife Sara.

IN THE INTRODUCTION to his novel, Greer notes: "There's a certain irony in the fact that this tale of the deindustrial
future first appeared in serial form as a monthly blog post on the internet,
that most baroque of modern industrial society's technosystems. That said,
I'm grateful to all those who read, praised, and criticized the story in its
original form, and thus contributed mightily to whatever virtues it may
have.''

SO BE IT. It's a fantastic novel, and in my opinion the most important cli fi novel of the 21st century. Read it and weep ...for the future!

Just to whet your appetite for the massive cli fi tome of a novel, here's the first few paragraphs of STAR'S REACH....... And I will not give away any spoilers, as to what STAR'S REACH is and means. YOU MUST READ THIS BOOK IF YOU CARE ABOUT THE COLLCTIVE FUTURE OF HUMANITY.

The Place of Beginnings and Endings

ONE WET DAY on the road that runs alongside the Hiyo River toward
Sisnaddi, Plummer told me that every story in the world is just a
scrap of the only story there really is, one big and nameless tale that winds
from the beginning of things all the way to the end and sweeps up
everything worth telling in between. Everybody has some part in that story,
he said, even if it's just a matter of watching smoke from a battle over the
next hill or listening to news that's whispered in the night. Some people
wander further into the story and then wander right back out of it again,
after they've carried a message or a load of firewood that settles the fate of
a country or a dream. Sometimes, though, somebody no different from any
of these others stumbles and falls into the deep places of the only story
there is, and gets picked up and spun around like a leaf in a flood until
finally the waters either drown him for good or toss him up gasping and
alive on the bank.

Plummer said all of that between one mouthful of cheap Tucki
whiskey and the next, as we sat and waited out the rain under the shelter of
a ragged gray ruin left over from the old world, and I nodded and said
nothing and decided he was drunk. Now, though, I'm not so sure.

Yesterday I got to the one place on Mam Gaia's round belly I'd given up
expecting ever to come, and nearly got reborn doing it. As the five of us
who made it here sat in the darkness and waited for nightfall and wondered
if we would live to see morning, the thought came to me more than once
that this journey I'm trying to write out just now is part of something a
mother of a lot bigger than the travels of one stray ruinman from
Shanuga -- bigger, for that matter, than the different roads that led each of
us here, bigger than Shanuga or Meriga itself.

(c) Copyright 2014 John Michael Greer

KEY WORD - RUINMAN

AND THE NOVEL ENDS THIS WAY:

There are three pieces of paper pasted on the inside back cover of the 
original notebook. The first is a handwritten note, which seems originally to 
have been pinned to the outside of the front cover:

My dear Lissa,
This is the manuscript I told you about. You may read it if you wish, but please 
don’t make a copy of it or show it to anyone else in the guild, and give it to (a 
word or name carefully blotted out with ink) as soon as possible. She’ll see to it 
that it gets to the place it needs to be.

With all my thanks and gratitude, 
Eleen darra Sofee

Below this is a handwritten label:

Manuscript #338
Received into this collection on 14 Janwer,
24th year of Sharl sunna Sheren’s Presdency
Below this is a printed label:
This manuscript, accession number 2878,

has been placed in the special collections 
of the Central Archive of the Guild of Rememberers
on the occasion of its public dedication
on the twenty-second day of Toba 
in the sixteenth year of Trey VII, 
Presden of the Union of Great Meriga
being in the ancient calendar
October 22, 2821 A.D.
------------------------------------------------------


BRIAN KALLNER ends his very positive thumbs up review with:
Star’s Reach has a didactic purpose, of course, and the plot and characters exist to make Greer’s points......... It [is] an entertaining read......and a thoughtful speculation of what our descendants might see.

Name: Brian KallerBrian Kaller Homesteading Journalist
Occupation: Newspaper columnist / Publisher Liaison
Place of Residence: County Kildare, Ireland
Background and Personal History:

Brian Kaller reported for newspapers in Kansas and Missouri, covering farms, crime, and politics. He wrote a science column for children, worked as a film critic, and managed a weekly magazine. Then, several years ago, he moved his family to rural Ireland, where they built a homestead and study traditional ways of life.

He collects interviews with elderly Irish, many of whom grew up without electricity, cars or modern media, with skills and knowledge that much of the world has forgotten.

When not working a day job in Dublin, Kaller writes a weekly column for an Irish newspaper, blogs at "Restoring Mayberry" (http://restoringmayberry.blogspot.ie) and writes freelance pieces for the American Conservative, Front Porch Republic, the Dallas Morning News and other publications.

Most importantly of all, he raises a daughter.
Current Projects: Raising a nine-year-old, trying to write a book.
Other Fun Facts: Brian only recently got the internet where he lives.
More Places to Find Brian on the Web:

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/biographies/brian-kaller-homesteading-journalist-in-ireland.aspx#ixzz3EPhtF5lT

COMMENTS

1. JMG, Congratulations! ''Stars Reach'' did not inspire me as a world I would want to be living in, but it was a beautiful story. It's heartfelt and absolutely captivating! The way you wove the narrative back and forth across time was brilliant and the end brought a tear to my eye. It actually mirrored an experience I had in a research library years ago from the opposite side, taking a book off of a shelf and holding history in my hands. 

I was so thankful that I didn't discover it until late last year as waiting for chapters year after year would have been absolute torture. I will be getting a copy as soon as the budget allows. I want it in my library and I'm curious about the final form it took. 

I can't help but think it will be a huge success if only people know about it. Mention the places it is for sale and I will seek it out to give a glowing review. Thank you for this gift of many hours of pure pleasure and suspense!

2. When I started reading Star's Reach in the blog posts, it reminded me in various (often subtle) ways of John Crowley's Engine Summer. Which has long been my single favorite work of fiction of any era or genre. This was before I learned (from various ADR comments) that you're well versed in John Crowley's works. And before I got accustomed to that species of synchronicity being par for the course around here.

I have a print copy on the way. I wish a hardcover were available.

If this is the literary success it had (from reading the first two thirds) the potential to be, I'll be recommending it and/or gifting it to a number of people and groups who I think will appreciate it.

The appeal for me (as I see it now, pending reading the rest and more careful review) is that there have been thousands of novels about the aftermath of nuclear or environmental devastation, but few of them are physically realistic and even fewer allow their characters to fully inhabit their worlds. The rest indulge in being "cautionary" and yes, I mean that as a negative, because it invariably means the characters are too busy demonstrating (if not outright preaching) what we shouldn't'a or should'a done back here in their past, to believably live their own lives on their own terms.

In the portion I read online, only one brief scene in Star's Reachstrayed into something like traditional "cautionary" territory. I'll not spoil anything here, but I think most readers will recognize the scene I refer to and agree that it stands out, even though most will probably disagree that it's any kind of flaw. (A discussion for a later time, perhaps, if I haven't changed my mind by then.)

3. 

Ed Powers on Naomi Klein


From Ed Powers in IRELAND, these notes on Naomi Klein new nonfiction book on climate:
FULL TEXT at www.independent.ie
''THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING'' (or does it?)
Naomi Klein in her break-out book ''No Logo'' delivered the bombshell that branding is manipulative, and global mega corporations past-masters at exploiting, for financial gain, our deepest desires and insecurities..... 
Her new book on climate propounds that globalism, fuelled by free-market capitalism, is the driving force behind climate change and the ruin it threatens to bring down on all our heads. This, it might be argued, is stating the obvious. We all understand that, the more we consume, the greater the pollution - and that, the more we pollute, the higher the risk of irreversible climate change.
However, Klein possesses a remarkable talent for making an argument that could feel preachy and, frankly, dull, vivid and engaging. She does so by approaching the subject as a boots-on-the-ground reporter rather than talking-head gazing down from an ivory tower.
So she travels to a conference organised by climate change deniers and, later, meets with anti-fracking protesters in Canada. The most interesting section concerns the phenomenon of extravagantly-munificent billionaires such as Bill Gates and Richard Branson who make a great noise about their charitable endeavours and yet, in their businesses says Klein, are culpable in helping increase the rate of climate change.
It is a worthy topic but one already discussed to death. 

However, Klein makes the threat to the planet - to the well-being of each of us - feel incredibly vivid. She may not take it as a compliment, nonetheless, there is no doubting that as a marshaller of melodrama, she is peerless. 

"The bottom line is that our economic system and our planetary system are now at war. Only one of these sets of rules can be changed, and it's not the laws of nature," she writes.